Browsing Items (7245 total)


Couple sitting on steps [Boone, N.C.: April 3, 1927]
Two men on steps [April 3, 1927]
Woman sitting on rock [March 20, 1927]
Couple sitting in forest [March 20, 1927]
Two men standing near fence [April 17, 1927]
Man sitting on steps [April 3, 1927]
Four people standing near bridge [May 10, 1927]
Couple standing at bridge [May 15, 1927]
Woman standing near column [May 15, 1927]
Couple on bridge [May 15, 1927]
Three students in snow [February 21, 1927]
Three women standing in snow [February 21, 1927]
Boy in dog-pulled wagon [March 13, 1927]
Woman on steps [July 4, 1927]
Woman in front of building [Boone, N.C.: March 7, 1927]
Woman sitting on steps [undated]
Woman with umbrella [July 26, 1927]
Five women on steps [Boone, N.C.: March 7, 1927]
Three men at building entrance [June 21, 1925]
Two couples on steps [June 21, 1925]
Couple in field [June 21, 1925]
Group around Daniel Boone Monument [July 21, 1925]
Boy In field [April 15, 1926]
Three people under tree [July 21, 1925]
Couple sitting under tree [July 21, 1925]
Appalachian Training School [Boone, NC: April 3, 1927]
Two Women on Lawn
Woman by Car [March 20, 1927]
Man in Car
Class, circa 1922

This image shows an Appalachian Training School (1903-1925) class standing in front of the Science Building, built 1911. Professor Chapell Wilson can be seen sitting in the foreground. Wilson taught education and psychology at Appalachian State from 1922 to his death in 1957.
Women's Basketball, 1930

This image shows the 1929-1930 Women's Basketball team in front of the Women's Gymnasium, built 1934, at Appalachian State Teachers College (1929-1967) in 1930. Women can be seen standing in their uniforms, while two players sit on the steps, one holding a basketball reading, "A.S.T.C. '30." Women had an outside basketball court, as well as a tennis court and croquet ground, as well as use of the Gymnasium, which was eventually turned into the Women's Gymnasium. Games were forbidden during school hours, and matches required faculty consent. This image appears in the 1930 Rhododendron (p. 89).
Gas in Boone, 1986

This image shows the price of self-serve regular (leaded) and unleaded gasoline in Boone, NC, in December 1986. The sign reads, "Regular .79.9" and "Unleaded .88.9." The student newspaper concluded these prices were higher than the average North Carolina city. This image appears in the December 9, 1986, edition of "The Appalachian" (p. 1).
Fountain, 1986

This image shows students sitting on the edge of a drained fountain in front of Varsity Gym in October 1986. A student in the center can be seen playing a guitar. This image appears in the October 2, 1986, edition of "The Appalachian" (p. 6B).
Stray Dogs, 1986

This image shows two stray dogs playing with a third dog, whose leash has been tied to a railing outside Rankin Science Hall, built 1963, in February 1986. Stray dogs were common on the Appalachian State campus during the 1970s and 1980s, where they were fed by students and allowed to roam freely until the campus began enforcing leash laws. Dogs were officially banned by Chancellor Wey from campus buildings and the cafeteria in 1978. This image appears in the February 26, 1986, edition of "The Appalachian" (p. 3).
Workman Hall, photo 3

This image shows the southern entrance to Workman Residence Hall, built 1938, at Appalachian State University (1967-current) in August 1967. It was formerly the first Faculty Apartments building on campus, providing eight apartments and thirty single rooms for faculty and staff.
Campus Snow Scenes, circa 1965

This image shows the eastern corner of White Hall, built 1924, and the field beside it after a snowfall at Appalachian State Teachers College (1929-1967) in the mid-1960s. Workman Hall, built 1940 and formerly known as North Hall, can be seen in the background.
Workman Hall Dedication,  1967, photo 2

This image shows the attendees of the dedication ceremony for Workman Residence Hall, built 1938, at Appalachian State University (1967-current) in August 1967. People can be seen standing on the lawn in groups. Workman Hall was dedicated to Economics Professor John H. Workman and his sister, elementary school teacher Sara Workman. On the far left is Mr. Robert Snead, Vice Chancellor for Development And Public Affairs. On the far right is Mr. Robert Allen, Director of Communications. It was formerly the first Faculty Apartments building on campus, providing eight apartments and thirty single rooms for faculty and staff.
White Hall Demolition, 1968, photo 5

This image shows the demolition of White Residence Hall, built 1924, at Appalachian State University (1967-current) in June 1968. A segment in the center of the building can be seen partially collapsed from the rear. White Hall served as a dormitory for 128 women, and was situated on the promenade facing south, between Dauph-Blan Hall, built 1929, and Lovill Home, built 1915. The building was torn down to add to the Sanford Mall area.
Workman Hall Dedication,  1967, photo 1

This image shows the Director of Public Affairs Bob Allen standing with a woman outside Workman Residence Hall, built 1938, after its dedication at Appalachian State University (1967-current) in August 1967. Workman Hall was dedicated to Economics Professor John H. Workman and his sister, elementary school teacher Sara Workman. It was formerly the first Faculty Apartments building on campus, providing eight apartments and thirty single rooms for faculty and staff.
White Hall Demolition, 1968, photo 4

This image shows the demolition of White Residence Hall, built 1924, at Appalachian State University (1967-current) in June 1968. A bulldozer can be seen clearing a segment of the center of the building. White Hall served as a dormitory for 128 women, and was situated on the promenade facing south, between Dauph-Blan Hall, built 1929, and Lovill Home, built 1915. The building was torn down to add to the Sanford Mall area.
Workman Hall, photo 4

This image shows the southern entrance to Workman Residence Hall, built 1938, at Appalachian State University (1967-current) in August 1967. It was formerly the first Faculty Apartments building on campus, providing eight apartments and thirty single rooms for faculty and staff.
Workman Hall Dedication,  1967, photo 3

This image shows a student sitting at a reel-to-reel tape recorder during the dedication of Workman Residence Hall, built 1938, at Appalachian State University (1967-current) in August 1967. He can be seen wearing headphones and adjusting a setting on the recorder, and is likely recording the speeches made at the dedication ceremony. Another student can be seen in the background sitting at an organ. Workman Hall was dedicated to Economics Professor John H. Workman and his sister, elementary school teacher Sara Workman. It was formerly the first Faculty Apartments building on campus, providing eight apartments and thirty single rooms for faculty and staff.
Faculty Apartments, first, circa 1950

This image shows the southern entrance (main) to the first Faculty Apartments building, built 1938, at Appalachian State Teachers College (1929-1967) in the late 1940s or early 1950s. It was formerly the first Faculty Apartments building on campus, providing eight apartments and thirty single rooms for faculty and staff. It was renamed North Hall after the second Faculty Apartments building was completed in 1953. It was positioned on Locust Street on the west side of Coffey Hall, and was demolished in 1993 to make room for an extension of Plemmons Student Union.
Workman Hall, photo 2

This image shows the southern entrance to Workman Residence Hall, built 1938, at Appalachian State University (1967-current) in August 1967. It was formerly the first Faculty Apartments building on campus, providing eight apartments and thirty single rooms for faculty and staff.It was positioned on Locust Street west of Coffey Hall, and was demolished in 1993 to make room for an extension of Plemmons Student Union.
Workman Hall Dedication,  1967, photo 4

This image shows the Director of Public Affairs Bob Allen standing with his wife, Mary Allen, outside Workman Residence Hall, built 1938, after its dedication at Appalachian State University (1967-current) in August 1967. Workman Hall was dedicated to Economics Professor John H. Workman and his sister, elementary school teacher Sara Workman. It was formerly the first Faculty Apartments building on campus, providing eight apartments and thirty single rooms for faculty and staff.
White Hall Demolition, 1968, photo 3

This image shows the demolition of White Residence Hall, built 1924, at Appalachian State University (1967-current) in June 1968. A section of the building can be seen collapsed. Four students can be seen walking on the Promenade in the foreground and workers can be seen in the background. White Hall served as a dormitory for 128 women, and was situated on the promenade facing south, between Dauph-Blan Hall, built 1929, and Lovill Home, built 1915. The building was torn down to add to the Sanford Mall area.
Appalachian Elementary School, classroom, photo 3

This image shows a classroom at Appalachian Elementary School, built 1954 and also known as the Demonstration Elementary School. Papers and photographs can be seen taped outside a window looking into a classroom. Unoccupied desks and chairs can be seen organized in rows throughout the room. Appalachian Elementary School (1925-1975) was a cooperative institution between the Appalachian State Teachers College (1929-1967) and Watauga County Schools, where the College would provide a building and teachers for Watauga County students, providing teacher training to Appalachian State students. The program ended in 1975 and the building was renamed Whitener Hall in 1975. It was demolished in 2006.
Appalachian Elementary School, classroom, photo 2

This image shows custodian Avery L. Jackson, Sr., sweeping the floor of a classroom in Appalachian Elementary School, built in 1954 and also known as the Demonstration Elementary School. Unoccupied desks and chairs can be seen organized in rows throughout the room. Appalachian Elementary School (1925-1975) was a cooperative institution between the Appalachian State Teachers College (1929-1967) and Watauga County Schools, where the College would provide a building and teachers for Watauga County students, providing teacher training to Appalachian State students. The program ended in 1975 and the building was renamed Whitener Hall in 1975. It was demolished in 2006. Avery L. Jackson, Sr., was a custodian for Appalachian Elementary School from 1952 to 1974.
Cove Creek High School, circa 1965, photo 2

This image shows the Cove Creek High School in Cove Creek, North Carolina, in the mid-1960s. It was one of five high schools in Watauga County that were merged by the Watauga County Board of Education to form Watauga High School, which opened in 1965. The others included Appalachian High School (1938-1965), Blowing Rock Union School, Cove Creek, and Watauga Consolidated School.
Welborn Cafeteria, extension, circa 1965, photo 2

This image shows the construction of an extension of Welborn Hall, built 1925, at Appalachian State Teachers College (1929-1967). The rear of the original building and the 1958 addition can be seen on the right in the background. Originally known as Central Dining Hall, it was known as simply as "the Cafeteria" since 1938, until being renamed Welborn in 1981. Renovations and additions were made in 1958, 1965, 1968, and 1988. It was demolished in February 2009 after the completion of the new Central Dining Hall.