Appalachian State University Memory Project


In 2006, Belk Library Archivists Kathy Staley and Pam Mitchem began the Appalachian State University Memory Project to document the physical, economic, social, administrative, and academic development of Appalachian State University and its surrounding community. In 2015 Professor and Librarian Mary Reichel continued the oral histories in order to expand our knowledge of Appalachian State University through the recollections and memories of people who contributed to the daily life of the university. Information gathered from this project provides a unique prospective on ASU's history and highlights individual contributions, as well as providing biographical information on the interviewees. The goal of the project is to create a collection of interviews reflecting university and community culture, similar to the University Archive Oral History Collection, led by Ruth Currie before the turn of the twenty-first century. The Appalachian State University Memory Project collection will be housed in University Archives within Special Collections, this collection become a part of the permanent collection to celebrate and preserve the history of Appalachian State University.

Kathleen Winborne Hodges began school at Appalachian State University in September of 1941 after attending Louisburg Junior College from 1939-1940. Kathleen graduated from the university in May of 1943 with a bachelor’s in English and he spent her life teaching and running a hardware company with her husband in Boone. She lived in Florida for a short while but came back to Boone after realizing how much she missed the mountain atmosphere.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Daisy Adams earned her undergraduate (1936-1939) and her master degree at Appalachian State University. She grew up in and continued to live in the Boone area after graduation. Adams taught in Watauga County for 32 years and in 2001 the Daisy Adams Scholarship was established to help local education majors receive their own degrees. Daisy Adams passed away on June 8th, 2014 at the age of 97.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Kyle Dickson attended Appalachian State Teachers College from 1935-1939 and earned a BS in History and English. He came back each summer after earning his undergraduate degree until he earned his MA in 1952. He was a member of multiple clubs including Playcrafters, and The Appalachian as well as Alpha Tau Kappa. Madge Gambill Dickson was also a student at Appalachian Teachers College. The two met in high school and remained a couple for the rest of their lives.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Jamarl Clark was born and raised in Charlotte, North Carolina and attended Appalachian State University in the mid 2000s. He was still a student when he was interviewed and was a member of the Plemmons Leadership Fellow, Renascent (a Christian sign language group), Alpha Pi Alpha, and the Black Student Association. He helped start the AIDS awareness week in 2005 and rose to presidency in his fraternity before graduation. The list of his accomplishments at Appalachian State keeps going but his interview also discusses what it was like being a minority on campus.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, leadership organizations, club memberships, nonprofit work, fraternities, minority relations at Appalachian, and his future plans.

Roberta Jackson was originally a student at Winston-Salem University before returning to work in Appalachian's Physical Plant and finishing her degree part time. Roberta worked for Appalachian from 1976-2007 where she worked her way up to an administrative position.

Information discussed in the interview: student life, working at the physical plant, administration, and retirement.

Neva "Dail" Bridges was a student at Appalachian State University from 1981-1982 before transferring to Chapel Hill where she graduated in 1983. She pursued a major in Psychology and a minor in Women's Studies at the time and created the Association for Women's Studies alongside her classmates. She participated in a number of feminist activities on campus and, after discovering her own homosexuality, began advocating for LGBT groups as well.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Stan South was an American archaeologist who attended Appalachian State Teachers College in 1944 and then from 1946-1949. He was in the Navy from 1945-1946 and after leaving Appalachian he earned his MA in Anthropology at University of Chapel Hill. He is a distinguished archaeologist who is best known for his help in legitimizing archaeology as a scientific course of study and work as well as his research throughout North and South Carolina's historical locations. In 1969 he became a professor at the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology where he remained until his death in 2016.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Roby Triplett was a student at Appalachian State Teachers College from 1963-1965. He worked part time for the bookstore until he graduated and became a full-time employee. In 1971 he was promoted to bookstore manager where he worked until his retirement 20 years later. He died in 2011 after dealing with a long-term illness.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Eleanor Cook is a librarian at Appalachian who started here in 1990. She also received her second master's here in 1994 for Leadership in Higher Education. She earned both her undergraduate degree (1973-1977) and her MLS (1980-1982) at Chapel Hill. She was previously a librarian at North Carolina State University and Georgia Institute of Technology before coming here to Appalachian.

Information discussed in the interview: experiences at schools before Appalachian, changes in the University, changes in the library, Belk Library, Richard Barker, Mary Reichel, Micheal Treekly, and Library Science.

William Killian was a student at Appalachian State Teachers College from 1939-1943 and earned a BA in Science and Math. He joined the Navy for three years after graduation and, in 1969, established the Blue Ridge Community College. He served 39 years as a teacher and administrator and in 2008 he was inducted into the Rhododendron Society for his exemplary service as a teacher.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

John Magers attended Appalachian State University from 1989-1994. He began as a student in the music department before switching gears into environmental studies. He became very involved in the LGBT groups on campus which included SAGA, which he was a founding member of.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, LGBT issues and people, SAGA, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Patricia D. Beaver is an Emeritus Professor here at Appalachian State University who teaches Anthropology for the Center for Appalachian Studies. She was director of the Center for Appalachian Studies before stepping down. She has been at Appalachian State since 1974 after she received her Ph.D. at Duke University. She is a founding member of the Appalachian Women’s Studies program and in 2004 received the Cratis Williams/James Brown Service Award. She has multiple publications on her extensive research on gender, class, and ethnicity.

The "interview" is a lecture for the Women's Sex and Gender Series called "Isn't a Good Mother Supposed to Feel Guilty?"

Robert A. White of Denton, North Carolina was a member of the bluegrass group, New Deal String Band, where he was known as Quail White and played the bass.

Information discussed in the interview: Personal history, New Deal String Band, Red Clay Ramblers, Tommy Thompson, Alan Lomax, The Side Track, 1960s musicians, Carlton Haney, Doc Watson, The Fillmore East, Fred Bartenstein, Fred Burch, contemporary bluegrass, Luthiers, Bill Monroe, Bill Malone, Rosebud, Second Generation, Country Gentlemen, Ray Blackwell, Tony WIlliamson, Buddy Pendleton, and Durwood Edwards.

Alice Naylor received her Ph.D. here at Appalachian State University before joining the Department of Educational Media. She is now a retired professor emeritus as of 2008 after working in the Reich College of Education for 33 years.

Information discussed in the interview: Personal background, Department of Educational Media, Administrators, changes in the library, students, visiting authors, College of Education, being a director of the doctoral program, social climate of Boone, Women's studies, and the Boone community.

Bettie Bond arrived in Boone in 1971 and started working at the University in 1973 with the history department. She is now a retired professor emeritus who, in 2014, was awarded the Lewis R. Holding Philanthropic Leadership Award for her role as president of the Watauga County Community Foundation. She has served on that board for over twenty years now and continues to encourage her community members to get involved with local nonprofits.

Information discussed in the interview: Boone community and traditionalism, being a professor for ASU, coworkers, women's rights and issues, Alumni Association, Centennial, SASASAAS, Newport program, history department, and the Adult program.

Larry Keeter grew up in Spindale, North Carolina and although he was never a student at Appalachian State University he was hired as a Sociology professor in 1971. He served on the Faculty Senate board and was the first and only (as of 2017) faculty member to serve as mayor of Boone. He served from 1985-1989 and oversaw many major changes to the Boone area.

Information discussed in the interview: early and higher education, life as a professor at Appalachian State, faculty housing, chancellors, faculty senate, study abroad trips, time as mayor, and retirement.

Ben O'Neal was a student worker for special collections in 2009 who knew Tui St. George Tucker (a North Carolina musician). His interview is not about his life or experiences at school but his experiences with her and growing up in the same neighborhood that she lived in. He was a regular visitor of Tui and knew her well.

Information discusses in the interview: Tui St. George Tucker, Camp Catawba, Doug Miller, Liz Rose, Robert Jurgrau, Vera Lauchmann, and Tui's life.

Margaret Agle is the sister of William Leonard Eury who was a librarian at Appalachian from 1929 until his retirement in 1970. Margaret was able to attend Appalachian State Teachers College thanks to her brother. She began her studies here in 1934 but had to stop half way to help care for her family. She eventually came back to Appalachian and earned her bachelor's degree in education and a master's in English. After graduation she taught as an adjunct professor at ASU until she began teaching at Watauga High School where she retired. Margaret passed away in 2014 at the age of 97 leaving five children behind.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, her brother William Leonard Eury, and life after graduation.

Terry Taylor was the wife of an Appalachian State University professor, Jack Taylor, and although she never attended classes or taught at the University, she was an active member of the Watauga community. She was a social rights activist for those who had AIDS or were a part of the LGBT community and she started the PFLAG organization here in Boone as well as the AIDS Support Group.

Information discussed in the interview: PFLAG, AIDS support group, AIDS epidemic in Watuaga County, MASC, LGBT issues and rights, Western Youth Network, Watauga Youth Network, and medical centers of Watuaga.

Lottie Downie was born June 5th, 1933 in Adams, North Carolina where she spent her entire life until she attended college at Appalachian State University. She married James Ballard who died in 1971 and then married the late George Downie. Mrs. Downie had one child with her first husband. She attended Appalachian State University for the first time in the fall of 1951 and graduated with a BS in elementary education. She graduated from Appalachian with her masters in 1960. Lottie Downie now lives in Miami, Florida and Boone, North Carolina. She retired after a career as a teacher and school administrator at a number of schools.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

John Lane Idol grew up in the rural area of Deep Gap, North Carolina. He served in the Air Force before attending Appalachian State University in the fall of 1955 and graduating in the spring of 1958. John married Marjorie South on Thanksgiving in 1955. John received his BA from Appalachian State University and received both his MA and Ph.D. at the University of Arkansas throughout the early part of 1960. He has had a successful career as an educator, working at Clemson University, Converse College, Duke University, and UNC-Chapel Hill. John has written over five novels two including his experiences with the rural area of the Blue Ridge and Deep Gap.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Etta Idol was born in Purlear, North Carolina. She went to Appalachian State University in the fall of 1940 and came back to receive her Master’s in 1952. Etta married John Idol, also an Alumnus of Appalachian, in May of 1942 and raised their two children at Rippling Waters Farm where Etta spent her childhood. Etta taught home economics right after college, but after getting her Master’s degree she taught biology and chemistry. Etta still lives at her childhood home enjoying retirement at the age of ninety-three.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Mary Ann and Ruth spent their careers working for public school systems here in North Carolina. For various schools, Mary taught language arts and history while Ruth worked as a school librarian. They attended Appalachian State University from 1944-1948 and graduated with two majors each. The two spent their retired lives living together until Ruth’s death on December 5th, 2015.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Barbara Watkins Daye first came to Appalachian from her hometown of Forest City, North Carolina in 1955 and stayed until she completed her master’s degree in 1961. Barbara worked as a physical educator at Brevard College before returning to Appalachian and working her way up to becoming the Dean of Students. She married another Appalachian State alumnus and raised her daughter as she worked full time. Barbara retired in 2002 and has been enjoying giving back to Appalachian through the Watkins Daye Endowment Fund, the Sergeant Major Peter Lynch Scholarship, and three others eligible through the student employment programs.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Richard Howe attended Appalachian State Teachers College from 1957-1961 graduating with his B.S. in History and Physical Education. He earned his M.A. in American History and Higher Education in 1962 and spent time at multiple schools before earning his Ph.D. in History and Higher Education in 1972. Dr. Howe played basketball for Appalachian State during his undergraduate years and received a place in the Appalachian Athletics Hall of Fame in 1985. He currently serves as a professor in the Department of Leadership and Educational Studies.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Jim Cottrell attended Appalachian State University from 1964 until 1968. He received a bachelor’s degree in Business and Economics and then a master’s degree in Junior College Education. Jim is a Boone native who was born in Founder’s Hall and grew up running the old Appalachian bookstore with his father. Jim was a member of the golf team throughout his entire undergraduate career and after he graduated Jim started the French-Swiss Ski College. In 2000, Jim was awarded the Distinguished Alumni Award.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Hughlene Bostian Frank was a student here at Appalachian from 1965 to 1968. During her time here she focused on her studies and graduated with a major in math and education. After she graduated Hughlene married her husband Bill and continued to serve the community around her. She served on multiple university boards such as the Board of Trustees, the Foundation Board, and the College of Arts and Science Advancement Council; just to name a few. In 2003 she earned the Outstanding Service Award and is continuing to help plan the future with Appalachian.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Eula Mae Fox is an Appalachian State Alumni who received her bachelor’s degree in home economics and secondary education in 1949. She worked as a science and language arts teacher for years before returning to Appalachian to get her master’s in counseling. Eula Mae married Everett Fox, a fellow Appalachian Alumni, in 1955 and together they had four children who lead successful lives. Eula Mae now lives as a retired woman here in Boone, North Carolina and spends her time around family and friends.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Reba and Grady Moretz both grew up near Appalachian State Teacher’s College until it was time for both of them to go to college. Reba chose to attend Appalachian and study music while Grady went to Chapel Hill to study business. After college, Grady entered the Navy and Reba dove head first into the world of teaching. Once Grady returned to the states, they began dating and later married after moving back to Boone. The two then began the Appalachian Ski Mountain and have been successful business owners since. They have two children and six grandchildren.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Patricia Beane was the first African American person to step foot and live on Appalachian’s campus. She attended Appalachian from 1963-1966 and had to drop out right before her final year because of trouble at home. She was pursuing a major in Music and a minor in Psychology. She was a beloved member of the band and continued to pursue music through her involvement at church. In 2015, she received an honorary diploma for a bachelor’s degree in music and the Black and Gold Medallion. She currently lives in her hometown Lenoir, North Carolina with her husband, children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Wes and Pat attended Appalachian during the late 60s and after getting married they have continued to live here in Boone. Wes graduated with a BA in math education and an MA in counseling. He served multiple years overseas and eventually began to work for Student Development here on campus. Pat graduated with a BA in home economics education but was immediately hired to work as Associate Director of Food Services at Appalachian. She stayed in that position until retirement.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Jeannine Underdown Collins has spent her life in Boone, North Carolina since she moved here in 1975 after graduating from Elkin High School. She was a diligent member of the flag core, Kappa Delta Sorority, and the Appalachian Ambassadors. After receiving her B.A. in history education in 1979, she went back to Appalachian State to receive her M. A. in history graduate education in 1981. Jeannine has served on multiple boards for Appalachian State University and continues to volunteer for the betterment of the school. She married Randy Collins, a fellow Appalachian State Alumni, and continues to live here in Boone.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Dorothy “Dot” Barker grew up in Charlotte, North Carolina where she spent the majority of her life until she began school at Appalachian State Teacher’s College in 1951. She graduated with a bachelor’s in elementary education and, after teaching for a few years, returned to school for her master’s degree in 1958. She married Appalachian State alumni, Richard Barker, who passed away in 1991 after serving for over twenty years as the head librarian at Appalachian State University. Dorothy continues to live in Boone, North Carolina as a retired educator.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Bill Rhinehart has been a long time educator and scholar but his academic legacy started when became a student here at Appalachian in 1948. He took a break from his studies and joined the military but came back to receive his bachelor’s degree in 1956. Bill then went on to earn many other degrees including his Master of Arts degree in 1958. After he retired from a remarkable career in 1994, Bill remained an active member of Appalachian State University and has continued to donate substantial gifts to the library and school.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Although Glenn Wilcox was never an official student of Appalachian State University, he has grown up in the Boone area and served on Appalachian State’s Board of Trustees for eight years. His daughter, Sharon, who joined him for the interview, was a student at Appalachian between 1971 and 1976 where she studied piano. Sharon Moulds spent her childhood going to the elementary schools that Appalachian owns.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, life in Boone as a non-student, board of trustees, Wilcox World Travel and Tours, and life as a business owner and active community member.

Thomas L. Rokoske was never a student at Appalachian State University but came to Boone in 1964 as the second professor of Physics for Appalachian. His career spans 41 years and many adjunct years when he taught after his retirement in 2009. He served as interim chair of the Astronomy and Physics Department for one year as well as the Faculty Grievance Committee. He is now a professor emeritus of physics and continues to live in retirement here in Boone with his wife Tish.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, being a professor at Appalachian, Boone community, Physics department, administrators, Faculty Grievance Committee, social life, and campus events/people.

Betsy Brown was a student at Appalachian State University from 1968-1972 and earned a BA in English. She served as NC State’s associate vice president for academic affairs until 2015. Susan Nelson attended Appalachian State University from 1968-1970 and after dropping out for a few years, she came back (1975-1977) and earned her degree in English and Business Administration and Management.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Senator Jim and Louise Broyhill are large supporters of Appalachian State University because of their childhood roots to the school and many members of their family are active participants of Appalachian’s events and boards. Senator Jim’s parents met at the Watauga Training School and Louise’s grandmother was Emma Horton who was Appalachian’s first head librarian who served for 44 years. Senator Broyhill has led a successful life as a Republican politician. He served as House of Representatives from North Carolina’s 9th district from 1963-1969 until his was changed to the 10th district where he served from 1969-1986. Then he temporarily served as US Senator from North Carolina from July to November in 1986 until he was edged out in the election by Terry Sanford. He now lives in Winston-Salem with his wife and continued to be active in politics as an elder statesman.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, Horton family, Boone's history, Appalachian Training School, Boone community, Broyhill family history, Board of Trustees, Senator Jim's political career, and Appalachian State University's history.

Betty Gill graduated from Appalachian State Teachers College in 1955 with a BS from the college of education. In 1961 she also earned a MA. She spent her career as an educator and librarian but she is now living back in Boone and continues to volunteer in the Boone community.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Kenneth E. Peacock first came to Appalachian in 1983 as a faculty member in the Accounting Department. He served as Associate Dean and Assistant Dean of the Walker College of Business before becoming Dean in 1992. In 2004 he was elected as the 6th Chancellor for Appalachian State University and he served for ten years before retiring. Rosanne Peacock is his wife who has been an active volunteer in the Boone community and together they have raised two children.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, college education, being a professor at Appalachian, College of Business, administrators, the Boone community, and Appalachian State University.

Carolyn Anderson was the first full-time African-American faculty member at Appalachian State University in 1969-1970 where she taught mathematics. In 2015 she was awarded the Faces of Courage Award for her role in Appalachian's early diversity efforts. She received her Master's degree in Mathematics here at Appalachian in 1969.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, college education, student life, graduate school, being a professor at Appalachian, Mathematics department, administrators, the Boone community, and life after Appalachian.

Dr. Fred Webb is a retired Professor Emeritus for the Geology department. He was never a student at Appalachian State University but he came to Boone as a professor in 1968. In 1971 he became chair of the department and in 1973 the geology department was created. He served as chair for the geology department for 20 years before stepping down. He worked at Appalachian State until 2004. He was rewarded for his service in the Geology department with the creation of the rock garden which is named after him. His wife Barbara was also not a student at Appalachian but she taught at the local high school and was an active member of the community. Their daughter Genny joined them for the interview and talked about her time as a student at Appalachian.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, college education, being a professor at Appalachian, Geology Department, administrators, the Boone community, faculty senate, and teaching as a exchange professor in China.

Vaughn Hayes was a student at Appalachian State University from 1964-1968. He earned a degree in history education and went on to teach for three years after graduation. He joined Lowe’s Companies Inc. in 1971 and while he worked there he took a variety of different positions in the company. While working at Lowe’s he earned his MBA and after 32 years, he is now the retired vice-president of store planning for Lowe’s. He has continued to serve ever since he graduated. He joined the Yosef Club in 1974 and has remained a member since as well as serving on the Club Advisory Council and the Appalachian Alumni Council. He is a past chair of the College of Arts and Sciences Advancement Council and member of the Centennial Campaign Steering Committee.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Houston Gwynne Jones is a 1949 graduate of Appalachian State Teachers College where he earned his BS in History and English. After graduation, Dr. Jones earned a MA from Vanderbilt University and his Ph.D. from Duke in 1965. He has remained an active volunteer for the university working with the Alumni Association and serving on the Library Advisory Board for two decades. In 2010 he inducted into the Reich College of Education’s Rhododendron Society and he was awarded Appalachian’s [ASTC’s] First Distinguished Alumni Award.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Larry Nance graduated from Appalachian State Teachers College in 1962 and received a master’s degree in 1963. He was a star player on the tennis team and played basketball for the school as well. Most of his career was spent at Appalachian State University in Personnel Services. Nanci Tolbert Nance attended ASTC for three undergraduate years (1960-1963) but then returned to Appalachian to receive her graduate degree in 1973. Nanci taught at Watauga High School as an English teacher and retired as chairman of the English department. Since their retirement they have been active donors and participants in ASU activities as well as volunteers in the Boone community.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.

Kenneth E. Peacock first came to Appalachian in 1983 as a faculty member in the Accounting Department. He served as Associate Dean and Assistant Dean of the Walker College of Business before becoming Dean in 1992. In 2004 he was elected as the 6th Chancellor for Appalachian State University and he served for ten years before retiring. Rosanne Peacock is his wife who has been an active volunteer in the Boone community and together they have raised two children.

Information discussed in the interview: time as chancellor, administration, and campus life.

Minnie Snead grew up in Boone on a farm off of Winkler’s Creek. She attended Appalachian Elementary and Appalachian High School before attending Appalachian State Teachers College in 1956. She graduated in 1960 with a Bachelor’s in Home Economics. She worked with Lucy Brock in the daycare all four years of her time here at Appalachian as well as participated in multiple club organizations. She married Bob Snead who is also a professor and administrator for the school. Together they have raised two children and continue to live in the Boone area.

Information discussed in the interview: childhood, early education, attendance at Appalachian State University, the dormitories, social events and habits, daily life, weather, relationships, sports, class life, jobs held while at school, the library, and life after graduation.
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