Dull Cares
 


Citation

“Dull Cares,” Appalachian State University Libraries Digital Collections, accessed April 17, 2024, https://omeka.library.appstate.edu/items/show/31483.


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Title

Dull Cares

Description

This item is part of the I. G. Greer Folksong Collection which consists of more than 300 individual song titles and their variants as collected by Isaac Garfield Greer (1881-1967) from informants, primarily in Ashe, Wilkes and Watauga counties. The collection includes manuscripts, typescript transcriptions produced by Dr. Greer’s clerical staff, and handwritten musical notations. Songs range from traditional Child Ballads, traditional English and Scottish ballads as well as their American variants, to 19th century popular music to musical compositions of local origin.

Subject

Folk songs
Worry--Songs and music
Mental health--Songs and music

Publisher

W. L. Eury Appalachian Collection, Appalachian State University

Contributor

Greer, I. G. (Isaac Garfield), 1881-1967

Format

PDF

Language

English

Type

Text

Transcription

Dull Cares

Why should we at our lots complain,
Or grieve at our distress!
Some think if they could riches gain,
They would gain true happiness,
Alas! How vain is all their gain!
This life will soon decay.
Then whilst we are here with friends so dear,
Let us drive dull cares away.

The only circumstances in life,
That ever I could find,
To soften care or temper strife,
Was a contented mind
Having that store we have much more,
Than wealth could ever convey
And whilst we are here with friends so dear,
We will drive dull cares away.

Why should the rich despise the poor?
Why should the poor repine?
We all will in a few years more,
In equal friendship join.
We are much to blame, we are all the same,
This life is made of clay
So whilst we are here with friends so dear,
Let us drive dull cares away.

Let us make the best we can of life,
Not render it a curse
But take it, as you would a wife,
For better or for worse.
Life at the best is but a jest.
A dreary wind is day.
So whilst we are here with friends so dear,
We will drive dull cares away.

Decline of life, old age comes on,
And we are young no more,
Let us now repine at what we have done,
Nor grieve that youth is over,
But cheerful be as formerly,
And innocently gay.
And whilst we are here, with friends so dear,
Let us drive dull cares away.

Scholarly Classification

Appears in The New England Pocket Songster, 1846

File name

113_DullCares_ocr

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Comments

Allowed tags: <p>, <a>, <em>, <strong>, <ul>, <ol>, <li>