University Library Art Collection


Library Art is a collection of artistic works produced mainly by students and local artists. The art is displayed in the University Library in permanent and rotating exhibits.

The Quest for Knowledge

Mural in the Atrium of Belk Library and Information Commons, Dedicated August 2005. Council said at the dedication: "The vortexes symbolize windows into the world. The scrolls illustrate an inward depository of knowledge that is projected into the library building. As information gathering and history are continuous, I have portrayed an infinite glowing path of knowledge. I wanted the imagery [of the scrolls] to relate to ancient scrolls that were present in the greatest of the ancient libraries in history. I have painted the ancient alphabets of the earliest forms of communication, that of Sumerian cuneiform, Egyptian hieroglyphics, Asian characters, as well as Hebrew script, early Celtic, Anglo Saxon runes and several mathematical equations that loosely illustrate the importance of math that enable the development of the arts and sciences. I have illustrated in an iconographic way the colleges and departments that make up this University. You will notice, the arts and sciences, educational studies with a link to the past as the Watauga Academy founded in 1899, Business, Theatre, Dance, Music, Biology, Physics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Philosophy and Religion, Geology, the applied arts, technology, sustainable building and environmental sciences, computer information systems, a focus on International exchange of and a Global perspective on learning. Last but not least the growing and popular Athletic department, with its historical championship wins illustrated for posterity. "In the upper area of the atrium, the open area with wood beams matches the existing pillars at the base of the atrium. An illusionary treatment creates the dimensional effect of this style of painting. A bright sunlit sky with fluffy floating clouds completes the illusion. The next section is not entirely visible unless you are on the 3rd and 4th floors. It is local and surrounding natural landmarks that are renowned. I have included The Blowing Rock, Linville Falls, Grandfather Mountain, and The Linn Cove Viaduct. They are painted in a monotone that emulates carved limestone block. The insets are some of my favorite native plant life in the area: Mountain fern, Trillium, Rhododendron, and the Dogwood, the state flower.
57-Latex
Henry the Sixth
Oliver Cromwell (1653-1658)

Oliver Cromwell (born 1630-died 1685). Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland. c. 1650
Early Bloom
Leonard Eury

William Leonard Eury was born to James Walter Eury and Lona Dee Douglas Eury in Gastonia in 1904. He received a B.A. degree from Duke University and B.S. (1937) and M.S. in Library Science (1951) from George Peabody College of Vanderbilt University. He taught mathematics and French from 1926 to 1929 at Clarkton High School in Clarkton, North Carolina and also served with the Army-Air Force 449th Bomb Group during World War II. Eury joined the staff of Appalachian Normal School on a full-time basis in 1929. He first worked under Librarian Emma H. Moore until he was promoted to Librarian in 1946. He retired in 1970. He was called both Len and Bill. He died on September 17, 1995 at his residence in Bessemer City, North Carolina. During his long career at Appalachian, the school evolved from a normal school to Appalachian State Teachers College to Appalachian State University. Eury managed the library's growth from two small rooms with about 2,000 books in 1929 through the establishment of the D.D. Dougherty Library in 1935, and the library's eventual move into the Carol Grotnes Belk Library (present-day Old Library Classroom Buildin) in 1968. In 1952, he developed a separate Music Library which is now housed in the Broyhill Music Center and assisted establishing a special collection devoted to preserving materials related to the Appalachian region. The W.L. Eury Appalachian Collection was dedicated in his honor in 1971.
Henry VIII (1491-1547)
Watauga Lake

Joan Morgan Meixell, Ed.D., has been working with the silk screen medium for over 30 years. Her training includes life painting courses with Morris Blackburn at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Several of her prints have won awards including first prize in graphics at the Perkiomen Valley Art Center's 1970 exhibition. Joan teaches print making at Appalachian and is a cataloger in the Music Library.
Charles I (1625-1649)

Charles I (Born 1600, executed 1649)
Sir Arthur Wellesley, First Duke of Wellington
Mary I, by Master John when she was 28 and still a Mary I, by Master John when she was 28 and still a Princess
Eunice Query and Ida Justice

Ila Taylor Justice (b. September 22, 1914) joined Appalachian State Teacher College faculty in 1949 and served for thirty-one years in the Department of Educational Media (now Library Science). For seventeen years Justice served as chair of the department. In 1973 Justice completed the Ed.S. degree in education and reading at Appalachian State University. Mary Eunice Query (1909-2007) joined Appalachian State Teacher College faculty in 1947 and taught for 25 years.
Lucky 8

Lucky 8, located in the park between the Library and the College Street parking deck, is a replica of a 16 x 12-foot sculpture created to commemorate the 2008 Olympics held in Beijing, China. The work reflects Belk's long history with the Olympics as one of the founders of the International Olympic Committee and chairman of the U.S. Olympic Committee for North Carolina. The piece was created by North Carolina artist Jon Hair who is well known for his large-scale depictions of Olympic athletes and university mascots. The original is on display in the Beijing International Sculpture Park. Hair notes that the work represents old China entering the 21st century as one ring seems to be pulling another out of the ground. The sculpture continuously changes color due to a special optical paint that was developed by NASA. At certain times of day, the sun casts a shadow of a figure eight, and walking through it brings good luck, Hair says.
Carol and Mary

Carol and Mary was created in honor of Belk's two granddaughters and is located near the entrance to the Library. This life size bronze sculpture depicts two college girls seated on a bench with books, book bag and back pack. The artist, Gregory Johnson of Cumming, GA, boasts works in more than 100 museum, university, corporate and private collections. He has won several prestigious awards for his art and was one of three finalists for the War Dog Memorial on the National Mall in Washington, DC.
Maureen and Bill Rhinehart

Bill Rhinehart received both his Bachelor of Science and his Master of Arts degrees from Appalachian State University. His education continued beyond his Masters with remedial education certifications from the University of Chicago and the University of Miami. Mr. Rhinehart also earned his certification in teaching learning disabilities as well as his certification for school administrators at Hofstra University. His formal education has also included studies in the history of French and English furniture designs from Parsons School of Design in New York City as well as studies in British history at Hofstra and Columbia Universities. Retired since 1994, Mr. Rhinehart has enjoyed a rewarding career as an educator, administrator, and consultant. His valuable work has spanned the globe, including positions in New York as a visiting lecturer in the School of Education at Southampton College of Long Island University, the Coordinator of Elementary Language Arts and Developmental Learning in Syosset, Long Island, as well as Adjunct Professor in the Graduate School of Reading and Education at Hofstra University. In addition he has served as a reading consultant to the Greenwich Public Schools in Connecticut as well as a consultant for the United States Air Force Dependent Schools in Germany. In North Carolina Mr. Rhinehart has coordinated the Waynesville, NC summer reading program and has also served as a reading consultant to the Charlotte City Schools. He has also returned to Appalachian State University as a visiting Assistant Professor for two summers in the Reich College of Education and also served as the President of Appalachian State University's Belk Library Advisory Board. Maureen Rhinehart recently retired from her career as a fifth grade classroom teacher at the Robbins Lane Elementary School in Syosset, New York. In addition to her work in the classroom, Mrs. Rhinehart has made significant contributions to the school as well as the Syosset Central School District. She was instrumental in the adoption of a new curriculum in science and written composition, and for many years served as one of the coordinators and trainers for the administration and scoring of the NYS Writing Test. Maureen Rhinehart demonstrated devotion to her classroom in many ways, including the successful planning and oversight of the first overnight trip to Philadelphia for Robbins Lane Elementary fifth graders. In June 1999, Mrs. Rhinehart was awarded the New York State PTA Distinguished Service Award.
Elizabeth I (1558-1603)
Unknown
Richard T. Barker

Richard T. Barker served as Appalachian State University's University Librarian from 1970 to 1993.
Late Fall at Winebargers Mill
Dr. Bingham Dai

Dai Bingheung (Dr. Bingham Dai), 1899-1996, was one of the first native-born Chinese to be trained in the new theories of psychiatry and psychology. In 1929, he travelled from China to the United States, where he obtained a M.A. (1932) and Ph.D. (1937) from the University of Chicago. In 1935, he returned to China and joined the faculty of the Peking Union Medical College. As a teacher and practitioner of psychotherapy, Dr. Dai began to develop his unique theories and procedures for treating patients through what he called self-study. This method combined traditional Confucian and Taoist principles with modern psychological theories, producing a course of treatment that enabled patients to understand themselves and the causes of their illnesses. With this self-knowledge, patients were empowered to find comfort, hope, and health. After the Japanese invasion of China in 1937, Dr. Dai left China in 1939 and returned to the United States. He accepted a teaching position at Duke University, in Durham, North Carolina, where he taught until his retirement in 1969. Following retirement, Dr. Dai moved to Spruce Pine, North Carolina, and lectured at nearby Appalachian State University. He also provided clinical training to the staff of several regional mental health centers.
Dearl Williams

Cratis Dearl Williams (April 5, 1911 - May 11, 1985) is considered the father of Appalachian Studies. Born to Curtis and Mona Whitt Williams in Caines Creek of Lawrence County, Kentucky, Williams worked as public school teacher, high school principal, college professor, college administrator. From 1942 to 1983, Appalachian State Teachers College employed Williams as an English teacher at their Appalachian Demonstration School. He also taught college courses. From 1958 to 1975, he served as the first dean of Appalachian State University's Graduate School. In 1974, Williams served as the Acting Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and then the next year as Acting Chancellor. He retired from Appalachian State University in 1976 but continued to work part-time as Special Assistant to the Chancellor writing his memoirs. He married twice first to Sylvia Graham, second to Elizabeth "Libby" Lingerfelt, and had two children by his second wife, Sophie and David. Williams' scholarship focused on ballads, Appalachian literature and Appalachian speech. His master's thesis, "Ballads and Songs" focuses on eastern Kentucky ballads. His dissertation is the authoritative examination of Appalachian literature, the 1,600 page analysis titled, "The Southern Mountaineer in Fact and Fiction." Many of his research notes burned in the 1966 Administration Building fire. Williams was the recipient of multiple honorary doctorates and academic awards. Four scholarships and the Appalachian State University Graduate School have been named after Williams.
The Old Place at Hatfield
House by the Sea
Log Cabin

Leniavell Trivette learned how to quilt as well as many other handicrafts from her late mother Elsie Trivette, the 1994 N.C. Heritage Award Recipient, who in turn learned from her mother and grandmother while growing up in the mountains of Avery County. Together, the mother and daughter participated in the prestigious Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1994. Lena herself participates in many heritage programs, such as Appalachian State University's Diversity Festival, the Watauga County NC Extension and Community Associations, and the North Carolina State Fair. She is a Heritage Crafts affiliate of the Southern Highland Crafts Guild and the Craftswoman of the Year 2000 with the Village of Yesteryear, North Carolina State Fair and has a quilt at the N.C. Museum of History. Log Cabin: The Log Cabin is attributed to the American pioneer dwelling, however, the earliest design has been found in mid-19th century England and may have its roots in European's 19th century fascination with Egypt. Small animal mummies are incorporated into the light-dark motif found in the Log Cabin. This Log Cabin quilt was machine pieced with multiple solid colors on polyester fabric and then hand-quilted with the running stitch.
Split Rail Fence

Leniavell Trivette learned how to quilt as well as many other handicrafts from her late mother Elsie Trivette, the 1994 N.C. Heritage Award Recipient. Elsie, in turn, learned from her mother and grandmother while growing up in the mountains of Avery County. Together, the mother and daughter participated in the prestigious Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1994. Lena herself participates in many heritage programs, such as Appalachian State University's Diversity Festival, the Watauga County NC Extension and Community Associations, and the North Carolina State Fair. She is a Heritage Crafts affiliate of the Southern Highland Crafts Guild and the Craftswoman of the Year 2000 with the Village of Yesteryear, North Carolina State Fair and has a quilt at the N.C. Museum of History. This quilt was machine pieced using light solid brown with coordinating prints and hand-quilted.
Jacob's Ladder/Underground Railroad

M Mueller is a self-taught quilter. He began quilting in Boone, in 2004, piecing on his grandmother's 1920s White Rotary sewing machine, which he still uses exclusively. He pieces on machine and quilts by hand. Though not a member of a guild, M's quilts have hung in the Turchin Center and the Belk Library and Information Commons in Boone, and the Caldwell Arts Council in Lenoir. M was a student at Berea College, Kentucky in the mid-1970s and graduated from UNC-Asheville. He has no formal training in the visual arts. Also a fiddler, M plays for square dances in the region. Inspired by a 1930s African-American quilt in the Farmer James Collection, this quilt honors both Anglo and African-American styles. An alternate name for the Jacob's Ladder is the Underground Railroad pattern. Jacob's Ladder was mentioned in the first book on quilts, Marie Webster's 1915 book, Quilts: Their Story and How to Make Them. Although Ruth Finley wrote in 1929 that it had Revolutionary era roots, quilt historian Barbara Brackman states that existing Jacob's Ladder quilts were all made after the turn of the 20th century. The quilt was machine pieced in multiple solid colors with a black and white border with red binding and hand-quilted with a running stitch. There is a stylized M as a signature in lower center.
Nine Patch

Jerra Unglesbee has been quilting for 20 years having taught herself to quilt when she moved to Watauga County. She has been a member of the Mountain Laurel Quilt Guild for about 15 years and won first place in a guild-wide competition for crazy quilt and challenges in 2000. She sews primarily traditional patterns and enjoys to hand quilt and applique. This "nine patch" pattern was pieced with Civil War Reproduction fabrics, a design popular then and now. This particular setting is special with sashing and posts. The quilt was machine pieced using multiple colors with green and desert rose focal points and hand-quilted.
Grandmother's Fan

The women of Deerfield United Methodist Church in Boone, North Carolina, have made quilts for a number of years to raise money for church projects. They prefer traditional quilt patterns and invest much time in hand quilting. One member provides a wooden frame for the project while different ladies donate cloth, batting, and thread. Week-end quilting bees are popular. In 2009, the quilters entered the Library's quilting contest to donate the purchase money to the Church's Benevolence Fund, which are administered to help families with emergency needs. Grandmother's Fan: The pattern was copied from a book by Georgia Bonesteel, whose UNC-TV Lap Quilting program has been on the air since 1979. Grandmother's Fan is a variation of the Dresden plate. The Fan motif was popularized in the 1880s and 1890s with America's increased contact with Japan. The fabric was donated by a long-time quilter to resemble fabrics used in her mother's quilts circa 1930. The stitch pattern is the fan pattern, sometimes called the Appalachian Stitch. The pattern was sketched with chalk and string, as was the method in the earlier days of quilting. This quilt was machine pieced with multiple prints on white background and hand-quilted.
Drunkard's Path Variation

Jerra Unglesbee has been quilting for 20 years having taught herself to quilt when she moved to Watauga County. She has been a member of the Mountain Laurel Quilt Guild for about 15 years and won first place in a guild-wide competition for crazy quilt and challenges in 2000. She sews primarily traditional patterns and enjoys to hand quilt and applique. Drunkard's Path is a long-time familiar quilt pattern. This variation of Sawtooth Borders makes it special and challenging. This quilt was machine pieced and hand-quilted with designs.
Cylinders
Elizabeth I (1558-1603)
Henry VIII (1491-1547)
Mary I, by Master John when she was 28 and still a Princess
Panorama of 17th Century London
Late Fall at Winebargers Mill
Appalachian Relic
Passages from the Fairie Queene

Part of the Idol Collection, varous paintings and pencil drawings
Read Posters of Student Athletes

11 posters were created in 2007
The Old Place at Hatfield
Artists Rendering of the Old Belk Library
John of Gaunt
Charles
Leonard Eury

William Leonard Eury was born to James Walter Eury and Lona Dee Douglas Eury in Gastonia in 1904. He received a B.A. degree from Duke University and B.S. (1937) and M.S. in Library Science (1951) from George Peabody College of Vanderbilt University. He taught mathematics and French from 1926 to 1929 at Clarkton High School in Clarkton, North Carolina and also served with the Army-Air Force 449th Bomb Group during World War II. Eury joined the staff of Appalachian Normal School on a full-time basis in 1929. He first worked under Librarian Emma H. Moore until he was promoted to Librarian in 1946. He retired in 1970. He was called both Len and Bill. He died on September 17, 1995 at his residence in Bessemer City, North Carolina. During his long career at Appalachian, the school evolved from a normal school to Appalachian State Teachers College to Appalachian State University. Eury managed the library's growth from two small rooms with about 2,000 books in 1929 through the establishment of the D.D. Dougherty Library in 1935, and the library's eventual move into the Carol Grotnes Belk Library (present-day Old Library Classroom Buildin) in 1968. In 1952, he developed a separate Music Library which is now housed in the Broyhill Music Center and assisted establishing a special collection devoted to preserving materials related to the Appalachian region. The W.L. Eury Appalachian Collection was dedicated in his honor in 1971.
C'ote D'azur

Donated by the French Embassy
Change of Command
ASU Library Expanision
Old Salem's First Presidental Reception
Print of Old Belk Library
Fred the Bear

Once upon a time, Frederick the Alaskan Brown Bear was part of an educational exhibit program at Appalachian State University. Frederick and the other exhibits visited many public schools in the region during each school year. Frederick spent his summer vacations in the Instructional Materials Center (IMC), an education collection in Appalachian's Belk Library. In the early 1980's, the Exhibits office closed and Frederick came live in the IMC. The children who came to see him through the years loved him. They would pat his fur and give him lots of bear hugs.